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Anne Conway

  • Principia philosophiæ antiquissimæ & recentissimæ de Deo, Christo & creatura id est de spiritu & materia in genere. (Amsterdam: [M. Brown?], 1690)
  • The Principles of the most Ancient and Modern Philosophy, concerning God, Christ, and the Creatures, viz. of Spirit and Matter in general; whereby may be resolved all those Problems or Difficulties, which neither by the School nor Common Modern Philosophy, nor by the Cartesian, Hobbesian, or Spinosian, could be discussed. Being a Little Treatise published since the Author’s Death, translated out of the English into Latin, with Annotations taken from the Ancient Philosophy of the Hebrews; and now again made English. By J. C. Medicinæ Professor. (London, 1692)

Ralph Cudworth: Chief Printed Works:

  • A Discourse concerning the True Notion of the Lords Supper. By R. C. (London: Richard Cotes, 1642)
  • The Union of Christ and the Church; in a Shadow. By R. C. (London: Richard Bishop, 1642)
  • A Sermon preached before the Honourable House of Commons, at Westminster, March 31. 1647. By R. Cudworth, B. D. (Cambridge: Roger Daniel, 1647): 2 impressions
  • A Sermon preached to the Honourable Society of Lincolnes-Inne. By R. Cudworth, D. D. Master of Christ’s College in Cambridge. (London: J. Flesher and R. Royston, 1664)
  • A Discourse concerning the True Notion of the Lord’s Supper. To which are added Two Sermons, on 1 John ch. 2. vers. 3, 4. [and] 1 Corinth. 15.57. By R. Cudworth, D. D., 2nd edition (London: J. Flesher for R. Royston, 1670)[1]
  • A Discourse concerning the True Notion of the Lord’s Supper. To which are added Two Sermons, on 1 John ch. 2. ver. 3, 4. [and] 1 Corinth. 15. 57. By R. Cudworth, D. D., 3rd edition (London: R. Royston, 1676)[2]
  • The True Intellectual System of the Universe: The First Part; wherein, All the Reason and Philosophy of Atheism is confuted; and its Impossibility demonstrated. By R. Cudworth, D. D. (London: Richard Royston, 1678)[3]
  • A Treatise concerning Eternal and Immutable Morality. By Ralph Cudworth, D.D. Formerly Master of Christ’s College in Cambridge. With a Preface by the Right Reverend Father in God, Edward Lord Bishop of Durham (London: James and John Knapton, 1731)[4]
  • A Treatise of Freewill, by Ralph Cudworth, D.D. sometime Master of Christ’s College, Cambridge. Now first edited, from the Original MS., and with Notes, by John Allen, M.A., Chaplain of King’s College, London, and Domestic Chaplain to the Lord Bishop of Chichester. (London: John W. Parker, 1838)[5]

Ralph Cudworth: Chief Manuscript Works:

  • ‘A Discourse concerning Liberty and Necessity’: Phase 1 Part 1 [BL Add. MS 4982(1)] (c.1658-c.1663)
  • ‘A Discourse concerning Liberty and Necessity’: Phase 1 Part 2 [BL Add. MS 4982(3)] (c.1658-c.1663)
  • ‘A Discourse concerning Liberty and Necessity’: Phase 1 Part 3 [BL Add. MS 4979] (c.1658-c.1663)[6]
  • ‘A Discourse concerning Liberty and Necessity’: Phase 1 Part 4 [BL Add. MS 4981] (c.1658-c.1663)[7]
  • ‘A Discourse concerning Liberty and Necessity’: Phase 2 [BL Add. MS 4980] (c.1658-c.1663)[8]
  • ‘A Discourse concerning Liberty and Necessity’: Summary [BL Add. MS 4980(S)] (c.1658-c.1663)[9]
  • ‘The True Intellectual System of the Universe: The Second Part’ [BL Add. MS 4982(2)] (c.1671)
  • ‘A Treatise of Freewill’ [BL Add. MS 4978] (c.1658-c.1688)
  • Notes and draft treatises on the Book of Daniel: Volume 1 [BL Add. MS 4986]
  • Notes and draft treatises on the Book of Daniel: Volume 2 [BL Add. MS 4987]

Henry More: Chief Printed Works:

  • [Psychodia] Platonica: Or A Platonicall Song of the Soul, consisting of Foure Severall Poems; viz. [Psychozoia, Psychathanasia, Antipschopannychia, Antimonopsychia]. Hereto is added a Paraphrasticall Interpretation of the answer of Apollo consulted by Amelius, about Plotinus soul departed this life. By H. M. Master of Arts, and Fellow of Christs Colledge in Cambridge. (Cambridge: Roger Daniel, 1642)
  • Democritus Platonissans: Or, An Essay upon the Infinity of Worlds out of Platonick Principles. Hereunto is annexed Cupids Conflict together with The Philosophers Devotion: And a Particular Interpretation appertaining to the Three Last Books of the Song of the Soul. By H. More Master of Arts, and Fellow of Christs Colledge in Cambridge. (Cambridge: Roger Daniel, 1646)
  • Philosophicall Poems, by Henry More: Master of Arts, and Fellow of Christs Colledge in Cambridge. (Cambridge: Roger Daniel, 1647)
  • Observations upon Anthroposophia theomagica, and Anima magica abscondita. By Alazonomastix Philalethes. (London, 1650)[10]
  • The Second Lash of Alazonomastix laid on in Mercie upon that Stubborn Youth Eugenius Philalethes: or A Sober Reply to a very Uncivill Answer to Certain Observations upon Anthroposophia theomagica, and Anima magica abscondita. (Cambridge, 1651)[11]
  • An Antidote against Atheisme, or An Appeal to the Natural Faculties of the Minde of Man, whether there be not a God. By Henry More Fellow of Christ Colledge in Cambridge., 1st edition (London: Roger Daniel, 1653)[12]
  • Conjectura cabbalistica. Or, A Conjectural Essay of Interpreting the Minde of Moses, according to a Threefold Cabbala: viz. Literal, Philosophica, Mystical, or, Divinely Moral. By Henry More Fellow of Christs College in Cambridge, 1st edition (London: James Flesher for William Morden, 1653)[13]
  • An Antidote against Atheism, or, An Appeal to the Naturall Faculties of the Minde of Man, whether there be not a God. By Henry More Fellow of Christ Colledge in Cambridge. The Second Edition corrected and enlarged: with An Appendix thereunto annexed., 2nd edition (London: J. Flesher for William Morden, 1655)[14]
  • Enthusiasmus triumphatus, or, A Discourse of the Nature, Causes, Kinds, and Cure, of Enthusiasme; written by Philophilus Parresiastes, and prefixed to Alazonomastix his Observations and Reply: whereunto is added a Letter of his to a Private Friend, wherein Certain Passages in his Reply are vindicated, and Severall Matters relating to Enthusiasme more fully cleared. (London: J. Flesher for W. Morden, 1656)[15]
  • The Immortality of the Soul, so farre forth as it is demonstrable from the Knowledge of Nature and the Light of Reason. By Henry More Fellow of Christ’s Colledge in Cambridge (London: J. Flesher for William Morden, 1659)[16]
  • An Explanation of the Grand Mystery of Godliness; or, A True and Faithfull Representation of the Everlasting Gospel of our Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ, the onely begotten Son of God and Sovereign over Men and Angels. By H. More, D. D. (London: J. Flesher for W. Morden, 1660)[17]
  • A Collection of Several Philosophical Writings of Dr Henry More Fellow of Christ’s Colledge in Cambridge. As namely, his Antidote against Atheism. Appendix to the said Antidote. Enthusiasmus triumphatus. Letters to Des-Cartes, &c. Immortality of the Soul. Conjectura Cabbalistica. The Second Edition more Correct and much enlarged (London: James Flesher for William Morden, 1662)
  • The Preface General.
  • An Antidote against Atheism: or, An Appeal to the Natural Faculties of the Mind of Man, whether there be not a God. By Henry More, D. D. The Third Edition corrected and enlarged: with An Appendix thereunto annexed.[18]
  • An Appendix to the Foregoing Antidote against Atheism: wherein is contained an Answer to Certain Objections made against Several Passages thereof. By Henry More, D. D. Fellow of Christ’s College in Cambridge.[19]
  • Enthusiasmus triumphatus; or, A Brief Discourse of the Nature, Causes, Kinds, and Cure of Enthusiasm. By Henry More, D. D. Fellow of Christ’s College in Cambridge.
  • Henrici Mori epistolæ quatuor ad Renatum Des-Cartes: cum responsis clarissimi philosophi ad duas priores, cúmque aliis aliquot epistolis, quarum occasiones, argumenta, ordinem versa pagina tibi commonstrabit.[20]
  • The Immortality of the Soul, so farre forth as it is demonstrable from the Knowledge of Nature and the Light of Reason. By Henry More, D. D. Fellow of Christ’s College in Cambridge.[21]
  • Conjectura cabbalistica. Or, A Conjectural Essay of interpreting the Mind of Moses, in the Three First Chapters of Genesis, according to a Threefold Cabbala: viz. Literal, Philosophical, Mystical, or, Divinely Moral. By Henry More, D. D. Fellow of Christ’s College in Cambridge.[22]
  • Epistola H. Mori ad V. C. quæ apologiam complectitur pro Cartesio, quæque introductionis loco esse poterit ad universam philosophiam Cartesianam. (London: J. Flesher for W. Morden, 1664)[23]
  • A Modest Enquiry into the Mystery of Iniquity …. By H. More, D. D. (London, 1664)
  • A Modest Enquiry into the Mystery of Iniquity, the First Part, containing a Careful and Impartial Delineation of the True Idea of Antichristianism in the Real and Genuine Members thereof, such as are indeed opposite to the Indispensable Purposes of the Gospel of Christ, and to the Interest of his Kingdome. By H. More, D. D.[24]
  • Synopsis prophetica, or, The Second Part of the Enquiry into the Mystery of Iniquity: containing a Compendious Prospect into those Prophecies of the Holy Scripture, wherein the Reign of Antichrist, or the Notorious Lapse or Degeneracy of the Church in all those Points comprised in the Idea of Antichristianism, is prefigured or foretold.[25]
  • The Apology of Dr. Henry More, Fellow of Christ’s College in Cambridge; wherein is contained as well a more General Account of the Manner and Scope of his Writings, as a Particular Explication of Several Passages in his Grand Mystery of Godliness.
  • Divine Dialogues, containing Sundry Disquisitions & Instructions concerning the Attributes and Providence of God. The Three First Dialogues, treating of the Attributes of God, and his Providence at large. Collected and compiled by the Care and Industry of F. P. (London: James Flesher, 1668)[26]
  • The Two Last Dialogues, treating of the Kingdome of God within us and without us, and of his Special Providence through Christ over his Church from the Beginning to the End of All Things. Whereunto is annexed A Brief Discourse of the True Grounds of the Certainty of Faith in Points of Religion, together with Some Few Plain Songs or Divine Hymns on the Chief Holy-Days of the Year. (London: J. Flesher, 1668)[27]
  • Enchiridion ethicum, præcipua moralis philosophiæ rudimenta complectens, illustrata utplurimum veterum monumentis, & ad probitatem vitæ perpetuò accommodata. Per Henricum Morum Cantabrigiensem. (London: J. Flesher for William Morden, 1668)[28]
  • Enchiridion ethicum, præcipua moralis philosophiæ rudimenta complectens, illustrata utplurimum veterum monumentis, & ad probitatem vitæ perpetuò accommodata. Per Henricum Morum Cantabrigiensem. Editio secunda: Cui accessit autoris Epistola ad V. C., 2nd edition (London: J. Flesher for William Morden, 1669) [29]
  • An Exposition of the Seven Epistles to the Seven Churches; together with A Brief Discourse of Idolatry; with Application to the Church of Rome. By Henry More D. D. (London: James Flesher, 1669)
  • A Propheticall Exposition of the Seven Epistles sent to the Seven Churches in Asia, from him that is, and was, and is to come.[30]
  • An Antidote against Idolatry: or, A Brief Discourse containing Sundry Considerations or Conclusions tending the Discovery of what is or ought to be held to be Idolatry amongst Christians. With Application to the Doctrine of the Council of Trent, and for the putting a Stop to the Romish Infection.
  • Enchiridion metaphysicum: sive, De rebus incorporeis succincta & luculenta dissertatio. Pars prima: De existententia & Natura rerum incorporearum in genere. In qua quamplurima mundi phænomena ad leges Cartesii mechanicas obiter expenduntur, illiúsque philosophiæ, & aliorum omnino omnium qui mundana phænomena in causas purè mechanicas solvi posse supponunt, vanitas falsitásque detegitur. Per H. M. Cantabrigiensem. (London: E. Flesher for William Morden, 1671)[31]
  • A Brief Reply to a Late Answer to Dr. Henry More his Antidote against Idolatry. Shewing that there is Nothing in the said Answer that does any ways weaken his Proofs of Idolatry against the Church of Rome, and therefore All are bound to take heed how they enter into, or continue in the Communion of that Church as they tender their own Salvation (London: J. Redmayne for Walter Kettilby, 1672)[32]
  • An Appendix to the Late Antidote against Idolatry wherein the True and Adequate Notion or Definition of Idolatry is proposed. Most Instances of Idolatry in the Roman Church thereby examined. Sundry Uses in the Church of England Cleared. With Some Serious Monitions touching Spiritual Idolatry thereunto annexed. (London: Walter Kettilby, 1673)[33]
  • Henrici Mori Cantabrigiensis Opera theologica, Anglice quidem primitùs scripta, nunc verò per autorem Latine reddita. Hisce novus præfixus est De synchronismis apocalypticis tractatulus, cum luculenta demonstratione necessariæ & inevitabilis intelligibitatis Visionum Apocalypticarum calci ejusdem tractatûs adjecta. (London: J. Macock for John Martyn and Walter Ketilby, 1675)[34]
  • Ad lectorem præfatio.
  • Visionum apocalypticarum ratio synchronistica tabulis synchronisticis universas apocalyseos visiones propheticas continentibus eximiè illustrata; cum luculenta demonstratione necessariæ & inevitabilis intellligibilitatis visionum apocalypticarum dissertationis calci adjecta. Per Hen. Morum, Cantabrigiensem.
  • Magni mysterii pietatis explanatio, sive vera ac fidelis repræsentatio æterni evangelii domini ac servatoris nostri Jesu Christi, Dei Filii, unigeniti, hominúmq; principis ac angelorum. Per H. M. D. D.[35]
  • Modesta inquisitio in mysterium iniquitatis. Pars prior diligentem justámq; complectens delineationem veræ ideæ anticristianismi in realibus genuinísq; illius membris, talibus utiq; quæ indispensabilibus institutis evangelii Christi ejúsq; regni incolumitati reverà adversentur. Per Henricum Morum Cantabrigiensem.[36]
  • Synopsis prophetica: sive Inquisitionis in mysterium iniquitatis pars posterior, compendiosum continens prospectum in illa sacræ scripturæ vaticinia, quibus regnum antichristi insignísve lapsus seu degeneratio ecclesiæ, in eis rebus omnibus quæ in idea antichristianismi comprehenduntur, præfiguratur vel prædicitur. Per Henricum Morum Cantabrigiensem.[37]
  • Expositio prophetica septem epistolarum ad septem ecclesias Asiaticas missarum, ab eo qui est & qui erat & qui venturus est. Per Henricum Morum Cantabrigiensem.
  • Antidotus adversus idolatriam: sive Dissertatio brevis multa complectens theoremata ad dignoscendum quid sit haberive debeat idololatria apud Christianos apprimè utilia. Cum applicatione ad doctrinam Concilii Tridentini ad sistendam, quantum fieri potest, contagionem Romanam. Per Henricum Morum Cantabrigiensem.[38]
  • Nuperi Antidoti adversus idololatriam Appendix: in qua vera & adequata notio seu definitio idololatriæ communiter sic dictæ proponitur, exempla plurima istiusmodi idololatriæ in Romana ecclesia per propositam definitionem examinantur, consuetudines quædam in ecclesia Anglicana vindicantur, seriæq; aliquot monitiones de idololatria spirituali demum annectuntur. Per Henricum Morum Cantabrigiensem.
  • Divinorum hymnorum heptachordon: sive in nativitatem Christi, in ejus passionem, resurrectionem, ascensionem, missionem Spiritûs Sancti, & in mundi creationem ejusque redemptionem per Christum re-introductione novæ creaturæ carmina septem, Anglicè primitùs scripta & nunc demum Latinè versa. Per Henricum Morum Cantabrigiensem.
  • Carmina quædam in scriptis philosophicis Anglicè occurentia et hîc per autorem Latinè reddita.
  • Rerum ac verborum locorumque S. Scripturæ in hoc volumine theologico explicatorum index locupletissimus.
  • Remarks upon Two Late Ingenious Discourses: The One, An Essay touching te Gravitation and Non-Gravitation of Fluid Bodies: The Other, Observations touching the Torricellian Experiment; so far forth as they may concern Passages in his Enchiridion metaphysicum. By Dr Henry More. (London: Walter Kettilby, 1676)[39]
  • Henrici Mori Cantabrigiensis Opera philosophica, tum quæ Latine, tum quæ Anglice primitus scripta sunt, nunc verò partim à seipso, partim ab amico notionum suarum philosophicarum perinde atque Latinæ linguæ callentissimo, in Latinum versa. Accesserunt scholia, quibus loca quamplurima aut illustrantur, aut emendantur, aut confirmantur deniq; & ab objectionibus quibuscunq; ullius quidem momenti vindicantur, ab authore passim adjecta., 2 vols. (London: J. Macock for J. Martyn and Walt. Kettilby, 1679)
  • Henrici Mori Cantabrigiensis Scriptorum philosophicorum tomus prior; qui præter Enchiridium ethicum et Enchiridium metaphysicum cum duabus illius appendicibus, multa alia scripta partim ad antiquam philosophiam Judaicam sive cabbalisticam, partim ad demonstrationem ac defensionem existentiæ Dei, & illius providentiæ pertinentia complectitur. Quorum omnium plenum Catalogum versa pagina tibi indicabit.[40]
  • Præfatio generalissima.
  • Enchiridion ethicum, præcipua moralis philosophiæ rudimenta complectens, illustrata utplurimum veterum monumentis, & ad probitatem vitæ perpetuò accommodata. Per Henricum Morum Cantabrigiensem. Editio tertia: cui accessit autoris epistola ad V. C.[41]
  • Epistola H. Mori ad V. C. quæ apologiam complectitur pro Catesio, quæque introductionis loco esse poterit ad universam philosophiam Cartesianam …. Editio quarta, omnium correctissima.
  • Enchiridion metaphysicum: sive, De rebus incorporeis succincta & luculenta dissertatio. Pars prima: De exsistentia & natura rerum incorporeum in genere. In qua quamplurima mundi phænomena ad leges Cartesii mechanicas obiter expenduntur, illiúsq; philosophiæ, & aliorum omnino omnium qui mundana phænomena in causas purè mechanicas solvi posse supponunt, vanitas falsitásque detegitur. Per H. M. Cantabrigiensem.[42]
  • Philosophematum eruditi authoris difficilium nugarum de principiis motuum naturalium, sive de essentiis mediis et de modo rarefactionis & condensationis, examinatio. Cum responsione ad ejusdem objectiones quæstionésve circa principium hylarchicum sive spiritum naturæ. Per H. M. Cantabrigiensem.
  • Adnotamenta in duas ingeniosas dissertationes: alteram, Tentamen de gravitatione et non-gravitatione corporum fluidorum; alteram, Difficiles nugas, sive Observationes circa experimentum Torricellianum appellatas, quatenus ad loca aliqua in Enchiridio suo metaphysico spectent. Per H. M. Cantabrigiensem.
  • Trium tabularum cabbalisticarum decem sephirothas sive numerationes exhibentium descriptio: viz. Tabulæ sephirotharum cabbalisticæ ac Judaicæ vulgaris: Tabulæ sephoritharum Knorrianæ vel Lorianæ in siblimiorus cabbalæ clavem Zoaristicam destinatæ; & Tabulæ sephirotharum Græcanicæ sive Pythagoricæ ab H. M. restitutae. Hisce præfixa est Epistola ad eruditissimum Virum Christianum Knorrium, de decem sephirotharum usu, &c. Per H. M. Cantabrigiensem.
  • Quæstiones et considerationes paucæ brevésque in tractatum primum libri Druschim, sive Introductionem metaphysicam ad cabbalam genuinam, authore R. Isaaco Loriensi. Quibus accessit Ad clarissimum & eruditissimum virum Christianum Knorrium de rebus in amica sua responsione ad dictas quæstiones, &c. Contentis ulterior disquisitio. Per Henricum Morum Cantabrigiensem.
  • Visionis Ezechielis sive Mercavæ, expositio, ex principiis philosophiæ Pythagoricæ præcipuisque theosophiæ Judaicæ reliquiis concinnata, miràque, cum locis quibusdam S. Scripturæ hactenus obscuris, luculentâque congruitate consolidata. Per Henricum Morum Cantabrigiensem.
  • Catechismus cabbalisticus sive Mercavæus: quo, in divinis mysteriis Mercavæ Ezechielis explicandis & Memoriâ retinendis, decem sephirotharum usus egregiè illustratur. Per Henricum Morum Cantabrigiensem.
  • Fundamenta philosophiæ sive cabbalæ aeto-pædo-melissææ, quæ omnem creationem propriè dictam negat, essentiamque supponit divinam quasi corporeo-spiritualem, mundumq; materialem aliquo modo spiritum. Cum brevi ac luculenta prædictorum fundamentorum confutatione …. Per Henricum Morum Cantabrigiensem.
  • Philosophiæ Teutonicæ censura: sive Epistola private ad amicum, quæ responsum complectitur ad quæstiones quinque de philosopho Teutonico Jacobo Behmen illiúsque philosophia, ab autore Latinè reddita …. Per Henricum Morum Cantabrigiensem.
  • Ad V. C. Epistola altera, quæ brevem Tractatûs theologico-politici confutationem complectitur, paucáque sub finem annexa habet de libri Francisci Cuperi scopo, cui titulus est, Arcana atheismi revelata, &c…. Per Henricum Morum Cantabigiensem.
  • Demonstrationis duarum propositionum, viz. {Ad Substantiam quatenus substantia est, necessariam existentiam pertinere, &, Unicam in mundo substantiam esse,} quæ præcipuæ apud Spinozium atheismi sunt columnæ, brevis solidáque confutatio.
  • Dialogi divini per autorem Latinè redditi disquisitiones varias et instructiones continentes de attributis et providentia Dei. Tres primi dialogi, qui de attributis Dei tractant ejúsque providentia in genere. Collecti & concinnati curâ ac industriâ F. P.
  • Rerum ac verborum locorumque Scripturæ in hoc primo volumnis philosophici tomo contentorum index.
  • Henrici Mori Cantabrigiensis Scriptorum philosophicorum tomus alter, qui suam variorum scriptorum philosophicorum collectionem primitus dictam compllectitur: viz. Antidotum adversus atheismum. Appendicem ad dictum antidotum. Enthusiasmum triumphatum. Epistolas ad Cartesium. Immortalitatem animæ. Conjecturam cabbalisticam. Quibus accessêre Divinorum dialogorum duo posteriores, qui de regno Dei tractant, & de speciali illius providentia per Christum super ecclesiam à principio usque ad finem sæculorum.[43]
  • Præfatio Generalis.
  • Antidotus adversùs atheismum: sive Ad naturales mentis humanæ facultates provocatio annon sit Deus. Per Henricum Morum Cantabrigiensem.[44]
  • Antecedentis Antidoti adversùs atheismum appendix. In qua continetur ad objectiones quasdam conera aliquot ejusdem loca factas responsio. Per Henricum Morum Cantabrigiensem.[45]
  • Enthusiasmus triumphatus: sive De natura, causis, generibus & curatione enthusiasmi brevis dissertatio. Per Henricum Morum Cantabrigiensem.[46]
  • Henrici Mori Cantabrigiensis Epistolæ quatuor ad Renatum Des-Cartes: cum responsis clarissimi philosophi ad duas priores, cúmque aliis aliquot Epistolis, quarum occasiones, argumenta, ordinem versa pagina tibi commonstrabit.
  • Immortalitas animæ, quatenus ex cognitione naturæ rationisbque lumine est demonstrabilis. Per Henricum Morum Cantabrigiensem.[47]
  • Conjectura cabbalistica, sive Mentis Mosaicæ in tribus primis capitibus Geneseos, secundùm triplicem cabbalam viz. literalem, philosophicam, mysticam sive divino-moralem interpretatio. Per Henricum Morum Cantabrigiensem.[48]
  • Dialogorum divinorum postremi duo ante annos ferè duodecim scripti, nunc verò per authorem in Latinum versi; qui tractant de regno Dei, et de speciali illius providentia per Christum super ecclesiam, a principio usque ad finem seculorum.[49]
  • Carmen quædam authoris partim ex poematis ejus philosophicis, partim aliunde desumpta.
  • Rerum ac verborum locorúmque Scripturæ in hoc altero voluminis philosophici tomo contentorum index.
  • Apocalypsis apocalypseos; or the Revelation of St John the Divine unveiled. Containing a Brief but Perspicuous and continued Exposition from Chapter to Chapter, and from Verse to Verse, of the Whole Book of the Apocalypse. (London: J. M. for J. Martyn and W. Kettilby, 1680)[50]
  • A Plain and continued Exposition of the Several Prophecies or Divine Visions of the Prophet Daniel, which have or may concern the People of God, whether Jew or Christian; whereunto is annexed a Threefold Appendage, touching Three Main Points, the First, relating to Daniel, the other Two to the Apocalypse. By Henry More D. D. (London: M. F. for Walter Kettilby, 1681)[51]
  • Tetractys Anti-Astrologica, or, The Four Chapters in the Explanation of the Grand Mystery of Godliness, which contain a Brief but Solid Confutation of Judiciary Astrology, with Annotations upon Each Chapter: Wherein the Wondrous Weaknesses of John Butler, B. D. his Answer called A Vindication of Astrology, &c. are laid open to the View of Every Intelligent Reader. By Hen. More, D. D. (London: J. M. for Walter Kettibly, 1681)[52]
  • Annotations upon the Two Foregoing Treatises, Lux orientalis, or An Enquiry into the Opinion of the Eastern Sages concerning the Præ-Existence of Souls; and the Discourse of Truth. Written for the more fully clearing and further confirming the Main Doctrines in Each Treatise. By one not unexercized in These Kinds of Speculation. (London: J. Collins and S. Lounds, 1682)[53]
  • An Illustration of those Two Abstruse Books in Holy Scripture, the Book of Daniel, and the Revelation of S. John, by continued, Brief, but Clear Notes, from Chapter to Chapter, and from Verse to Verse: with very Usefull and Apposite Arguments prefixt to Each Chapter; framed out of the Expositions of Dr. Henry More (London: M. Flesher for Walter Kettilby, 1685)[54]
  • Paralipomena prophetica containing Several Supplements and Defences of Dr Henry More his Expositions of the Prophet Daniel and the Apocalypse, whereby the Impregnable Firmness and Solidity of the said Expositions is further evidence to the World. Whereunto is also added Philicrines upon R. B. his Notes on the Revelation of S. John. (London: Walter Kettilby, 1685)[55]
  • ? Some Cursory Reflexions Impartially Made upon Mr. Richard Baxter his Way of writing Notes on the Apocalypse, and upon his Advertisement and Postscript. By Phililicrines Parrhesiastes. (London: Walter Kettilby, 1685)[56]
  • A Brief Discourse of the Real Presence of the Body and Blood of Christ in the Celebration of the Holy Eucharist: wherein the Witty Artifices of the Bishop of Meaux and of Monsieur Maimbourg are obviated, whereby they would draw in the Protestants to imbrace the Doctrine of Transubstantiation. (London: Walter Kettilby, 1686)[57]

John Smith

  • Select Discourses treating 1. Of the True Way or Method of attaining to Divine Knowledge. 2. Of Superstition. 3. Of Atheism. 4. Of the Immortality of the Soul. 5. Of the Existence and Nature of God. 6. Of Prophecy. 7. Of the Difference between the Legal and the Evangelical Righteousness, the Old and the New Covenant, &c. 8. Of the Shortness and Vanity of a Pharisaick Righteousness. 9. Of the Excellency and Nobleness of True Religion. 10. Of a Christians Conflicts with, and Conquests over, Satan. By John Smith, late Fellow of Queen’s College in Cambridge. As also a Sermon preached by Simon Patrick (then Fellow of the same College) at the Author’s Funeral: with a Brief Account of his Life and Death., 1st edition (London: J. Flesher for W. Morden, 1660)
  • Select Discourses treating 1. Of the True Way or Method of attaining to Divine Knowledge. 2. Of Superstition. 3. Of Atheism. 4. Of the Immortality of the Soul. 5. Of the Existence and Nature of God. 6. Of Prophesie. 7. Of the Difference between the Legal and the Evangelical Righteousness, the Old and the New Covenant, &c. 8. Of the Shortness and Vanity of a Pharisaick Righteousness. 9. Of the Excellency and Nobleness of True Religion. 10. Of a Christians Conflicts with, and Conquests over, Satan. By John Smith, late Fellow of Queens College in Cambridge. As also a Sermon preached by Simon Patrick D. D. (then Fellow of the same College) at the Author’s Funeral: with a Brief Account of his Life and Death. The Second Edition corrected, 2nd edition (Cambridge: John Hayes for W. Morden, 1673)[58]

Benjamin Whichcote: Chief Printed Works:

Aphorisms and Letters:

  • [Theophoroumena Dogmata]: Or, Some Select Notions of that Learned and Reverend Divine of the Church of England, Benk. Whitchcot, D. D. lately deceased. Faithfully collected from him by a Pupil and particular Friend of his, and published pro bono publico per & pro philanthropo. (London: Israel Harrison, 1685)
  • Moral and Religious Aphorisms. Wherein are contained, Many Doctrines of Truth; and Rules of Practice; which are of Universal Concernment, and of the Greatest Importance in the Life of Man. (Norwich: Fr. Burges for A. and J. Churchill and Tho. Goddard, 1703)
  • Moral and Religious Aphorisms. Collected from the Manuscript Papers of the Reverend and Learned Doctor Whichcote; and published in M DCC III, by Dr. Jeffery. Now re-published, with very Large Additions, from the Transcripts of the latter, by Samuel Salter, D. D. Prebendary of Norwich, and Curate of Great Yarmouth in Norfolk. To which are added, Eight Letters: which passed between Dr. Whichcote, Provost of King’s College; and Dr. Tuckney, Master of Emmanuel College, in Cambridge: on Several very Interesting Subjects. Now first published. (London: J. Payne, 1753)[59]

Select Sermons:

  • Select Sermons of Dr Whichcot. In Two Parts., 1st edition (London: Awnsham and John Churchill, 1698)[60]
  • Twelve Sermons, the First Six containing the Foundation of Natural and Reveal’d Religion, and the Proofs of Christianity. The Six Last consists of Sermons on Religious and Moral Subjects. By the Reverend and Learned Benjamin Whichcot, D. D. some time Minister of St. Lawrence Jewry, London. The Second Edition, 2nd edition (London: J. Wilcox, 1721)[61]
  • Select Sermons of Dr. Whichcot. In Two Parts. 3rd edition (Edinburgh: T. W. and T. Ruddimans for G. Hamilton and J. Balfour, 1742)[62]
  • Select Sermons of Dr. Whichcote. In Two Parts …. With an Excellent Recommendatory Epistle by the late Rev. and Learned Dr. Wishart. The Third Edition. 4th edition? (Bath: S. Hazard for T. Mills, G. Keith, S. Crowder, J. Matthews, S. Chirm, T. Cadell, W. Pine, and S. Edwards, 1773)[63]

Several Discourses:

  • Several Discourses: concerning The Shortness of Humane Charity. The Perfection of the Mercy of God. The Difference of Times with respect to Religion. The Joy which the Righteous have in God. The Secret Blasting of Men. The Instructive Discipline of God. The Danger of Unfaithfulness to God. The Malignity of Popery. The Deceitfulness of Sin. The Conversion of a Sinner. Also, the Prayer used before Sermon. By the Reverend and Learned, Benjamin Whichcot, D. D. sometime Minister of S. Lawrence Jewry, London. Examined and corrected by his own Notes; and published by John Jeffery, D. D. Archdeacon of Norwich., 1st edition (London: James Knapton, 1701)[64]
  • Several Discourses: concerning The Shortness of Humane Charity. The Perfection of the Mercy of God. The Difference of Times with respect to Religion. The Joy which the Righteous have in God. The Secret Blasting of Men. The Instructive Discipline of God. The Danger of Unfaithfulness to God. The Malignity of Popery. The Deceitfulness of Sin. The Conversion of a Sinner. Also the Prayer used before Sermon. By the Reverend and Learned, Benjamin Whichcot, D. D. sometime Minister of S. Lawrence Jewry, London. Examined and corrected by his own Notes; and published by John Jeffery, D. D. Archdeacon of Norwich. The Second Edition., 2nd edition (London: James Knapton, 1702)[65]
  • Several Discourses: concerning The True Valuation of Man. The Necessary Repentance of a Sinner. The Exercise and Progress of a Christian. The Practice of those who are improved. The Frailty of Humane Nature. The Instruction from the Judgments of God. The Justice of One Man towards Another. The Nature of Salvation by Christ. The Worth of Religion, and Sufferings for it. The Christian a Citizen of Heaven. By the Reverend and Learned, Benjamin Whichcote, D. D. sometime Minister of S. Lawrence Jewry, London. Volume II. Examined and Corrected by his own Notes, and published by John Jeffery, D. D. Archdeacon of Norwich. (London: James Knapton, 1702)[66]
  • Several Discourses: concerning The Moral Part of Religion reinforced by Christianity. The Reconciliation of Sinners by the Death of Christ. The Mediation of Christ, the Grand Institution of God. The Arguments by which Men should be persuaded to reconcile unto God. The Essence of Religion, a Disposition for God. The Decency of Life recommended by Religion. The Glorious Evidence and Power of Divine Truth. The Venerable Nature, and Transcendant Benefit of the Christian Religion. The Absolute Necessity of Religious Obedience, and Unavoidable Perdition of the Disobedient. The Illustrious Manifestations of God, and the Inexcusable Ignorance of Men. The Unnatural Ingratitude of the Profane and Irreligious. The Miserable Degeneracy of Men through their Affectation of Atheism, and Practice of Wickedness. The Direful Vengeance which falls upon the Souls of Incorrigible Sinners. That those who are truly Religious, will be delivered from all Dangerous Errors about Religion. That the Unity of the Church is carefully maintained by all those who are Sincere Christians. {The Two Last of which Discourses are a Continuation of Sermon VIII. Vol. II.} By the Reverend and Learned Benjamin Whichcote, D. D. sometime Minister of S. Lawrence Jewry, London. Examined and corrected by his own Notes; and published by John Jeffery, D. D. Arch-deacon of Norwich. Volume III. (London: James Knapton, 1703)[67]
  • Several Discourses upon Whatsoever Things are True: Whatsoever Things are Honest: Whatsoever Things are Just: Whatsoever Things are Pure: Whatsoever Things are Lovely: Whatsoever things are of Good Report: If there be Any Virtue: If there be Any Praise: Think on these Things. That Men have nothing to glory of, but Religion. That God hateth Wickedness. The Great Matters of Religion. Of Civility in Converse and Toleration of Different Opinions. The Great Instances of Wickedness. By the reverend and learned Benjamin Whichcote, D. D. sometime Minister of St Lawrence Jury, London. The Fourth and Last Volume. (London: W. Botham for James Knapton, 1707)[68]
  • The True Notion of Peace in the Kingdom or Church of Christ, stated by the late Eminent and Learned Dr. Whitchot, in a Sermon preach’d by him upon the Malignity of Popery, examined and corrected from his own Notes by John Jeffery, D. D. Arch-Deacon of Norwich; and now republished as being very usefully applicable to the Controversies of the Present Times. (London: James Knapton, 1717)
  • Several Discourses: concerning The True Valuation of Man. The Necessary Repentance of a Sinner. The Exercise and Progress of a Christian. The Practice of those who are improved. The Frailty of Humane Nature. The Instruction from the Judgments of God. The Justice of One Man towards Another. The Nature of Salvation by Christ. The Worth of Religion, and Sufferings for it. The Christian a Citizen of Heaven. By the Reverend and Learned, Benjamin Whichcote, D. D. sometime Minister of S. Lawrence Jewry, London. Volume II. Examined and Corrected by his own Notes; and published by John Jeffery, D. D. Archdeacon of Norwich., 2nd edition (London: James Knapton, 1719)[69]

The Works: (a composite edition of the Select Sermons and the Several Discourses)

  • The Works of the Learned Benjamin Whichcote, D. D. Rector of St. Lawrence Jewry, London, 4 vols. (Aberdeen: J. Chalmers for Alexander Thomson, 1751)

[1] First editions of all texts in this volume are available on our website.

[2] First editions of all texts in this volume are available on our website.

[3] Preface, chapters 1, 2, 3 (including the ‘Digression on Plastic Nature’), part of chapter 4 (on the ‘Platonic Trinity’, and conclusion of chapter 5 (on politics) are available.

[4] Book 1 chapters 1-3, book 4 chapters 2-3 and 6 are available.

[5] The manuscript source text for this treatise has been transcribed and is available on our website.

[6] Pages 1-8 of this text have been transcribed and are available on this website.

[7] The chapter on grace has been transcribed and is available on this website.

[8] Pages 1-75 of this text have been transcribed and are available on this website.

[9] This text is available in an edition by Bretau in The Cambridge Platonists in Philosophical Context, ed. Rogers et al.

[10] Transcription available on EEBO (TCP).

[11] Transcription available on EEBO (TCP).

[12] Transcription available on EEBO (TCP); portions of this text are available on this website in the 1662 edition.

[13] Transcription available on EEBO (TCP); portions of this text are available on this website in the 1662 edition.

[14] Portions of this text are available on this website in the 1662 edition.

[15] Transcription available on EEBO (TCP); portions of this text are available on this website in the 1662 edition.

[16] Transcription available on EEBO (TCP); portions of this text are available on this website in the 1662 edition.

[17] Book 1, Book 4 chapters 1-3, Book 5 chapters 1-6, Book 6 chapters 1-5, Book 8 chapters 5-6, and Book 10 are available.

[18] Book 1 and Book 2 are available.

[19] Chapters 1-10 are available.

[20] Includes More’s ‘Epistola ad V. C.’, the whole text, including the ‘Epistola ad V. C.’, is available on this website in the 1679 edition.

[21] Book 1, Book 2, and Book 3 chapter 1 are available.

[22] ‘An Appendix to the Defence of the Philosophick Cabbala’ is available.

[23] This text is available on this website in the 1679 edition.

[24] Book 1 chapters 1-5 are available.

[25] ‘The Preface to the Reader’ and Book 2 chapters 21-2 are available.

[26] ‘The Publisher to the Reader’, ‘The Epistle of Fr. Evistor’, ‘The Contents of the Three First Dialogues’, ‘The First Dialogue’, parts of ‘The Second Dialogue’ and parts of ‘The Third Dialogue’ are available.

[27] Parts of ‘The Fourth Dialogue’ and parts of ‘The Fifth Dialogue’ are available.

[28] Portions of this text are available on this website in the 1679 edition.

[29] Portions of this text are available on this website in the 1679 edition.

[30] Transcription available on EEBO (TCP).

[31] Portions of this text are available on this website in the 1679 edition.

[32] Transcription available on EEBO (TCP).

[33] Transcription available on EEBO (TCP).

[34] Described by More and his printers as vol. III of Henrici Mori Cantabrigiensis Opera omnia, tum quæ Latinè, tum quæ Anglicè scripta sunt; nunc vero Latinitate donata instigatu & impensis generosissimi juvenis Johannis Cockshuti nobilis Angli., 3 vols. (London: J. Macock for J. Martyn and Walter Kettilby, 1675-9).

[35] Portions of this text are available on this website in the English edition of 1660.

[36] Portions of this text are available on this website in the English edition of 1664.

[37] Portions of this text are available on this website in the English edition of 1664.

[38] Portions of this text are available on this website in the English edition of 1669.

[39] Transcription available on EEBO (TCP).

[40] Described by More and his printers as vol. I of Henrici Mori Cantabrigiensis Opera omnia, tum quæ Latinè, tum quæ Anglicè scripta sunt; nunc vero Latinitate donata instigatu & impensis generosissimi juvenis Johannis Cockshuti nobilis Angli., 3 vols. (London: J. Macock for J. Martyn and Walter Kettilby, 1675-9).

[41] Chapters 1-3 are available.

[42] Chapters 27-8 are available.

[43] Described by More and his printers as vol. II of Henrici Mori Cantabrigiensis Opera omnia, tum quæ Latinè, tum quæ Anglicè scripta sunt; nunc vero Latinitate donata instigatu & impensis generosissimi juvenis Johannis Cockshuti nobilis Angli., 3 vols. (London: J. Macock for J. Martyn and Walter Kettilby, 1675-9).

[44] Portions of this text are available on this website in the English edition of 1662.

[45] Portions of this text are available on this website in the English edition of 1662.

[46] This text is available on this website in the English edition of 1662.

[47] Portions of this text are available on this website in the English edition of 1662.

[48] Portions of this text are available on this website in the English edition of 1662.

[49] Portions of this text are available on this website in the English edition of 1662.

[50] Transcription available on EEBO (TCP).

[51] Transcription available on EEBO (TCP).

[52] Transcription available on EEBO (TCP).

[53] Transcription available on EEBO (TCP).

[54] Transcription available on EEBO (TCP).

[55] Transcription available on EEBO (TCP).

[56] Transcription available on EEBO (TCP).

[57] Transcription available on EEBO (TCP).

[58] The whole of this text is available on this website in the first edition of 1660.

[59] The Eight Letters are available.

[60] Sermons 2-6 are available, with the editorial title ‘Sermons on Romans 1:16-29: First Version (1698)’.

[61] Some of the sermons in this volume are available on this website in the first edition of 1698.

[62] Some of the sermons in this volume are available on this website in the first edition of 1698.

[63] Some of the sermons in this volume are available on this website in the first edition of 1698.

[64] Suggested abbreviated title: Several Discourses, vol. I, 1st edition (1701).

[65] Suggested abbreviated title: Several Discourses, vol. I, 2nd edition (1702).

[66] Suggested abbreviated title: Several Discourses, vol. II, 1st edition (1702).

[67] Suggested abbreviated title for the volume: Several Discourses, vol. III (1703). Discourses 14-28 are available, with the editorial title ‘Sermons on Romans 1:16-27: Second Version (1703)’.

[68] Suggested abbreviated title: Several Discourses, vol. IV (1707).

[69] Suggested abbreviated title: Several Discourses, vol. II, 2nd edition (1719).

Cite as: Critical Bibliography, http://dev.cambridge-platonism.divinity.cam.ac.uk/view/texts/normalised/our-methodology/critical-bibliography, accessed 2019-10-15.